i. ii. iii. iv. v.

     No one before Bernini had managed to make marble so carnal. In his nimble hands it would flatter and stream, quiver and sweat. His figures weep and shout, their torses twist and run, and arch themselves in spasms of intense sensation. He could, like an alchemist, change one material into another - marble into trees, leaves, hair, and, of course, flesh.  
     -   Simon Schama’s Power of Art. Bernini

(via art--gallery)

7 . 31 

theonlymagicleftisart:

Latest Photography by Oleg Oprisco

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Our Quarterly boxes are now $50 $30. The next box will include a hardcover photobook of Brandon C. Long's Polaroid photography and one lucky subscriber will receive a Polaroid camera and a pack of Impossible film: quarterly.co/art 

7 . 31 

(via migeru)

7 . 31 

fabelyn:

@haikyu_vobaca

(via ao-sky)

7 . 31 

some say the world will end in fire // some say in ice

(via stormborns)

7 . 31 

kuronumasawakos:

when you just miss the bus and you go all naruto and start running after it but then you realize you’re so out of shape from watching anime too much

image

7 . 30

humansofnewyork:

"What do you miss most about Brazil?""I’m not sure how to say in English. Can I email you?""Just try.""In Brazil. My people. Money or no money. Still happy."

humansofnewyork:

"What do you miss most about Brazil?"
"I’m not sure how to say in English. Can I email you?"
"Just try."
"In Brazil. My people. Money or no money. Still happy."

(via neymarbles)

7 . 30

(via rollingbarrel)

7 . 30 

shlnon:

FF13-2 ノエセラらくがきまとめ

shlnon:

FF13-2 ノエセラらくがきまとめ

7 . 30

humansofnewyork:

“We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”

humansofnewyork:

“We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”

(via like-aahs)

7 . 29